Course Descriptions

ACCT 110  Financial Accounting (3)

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of analyzing, recording and reporting financial data for business entities. Prerequisite: MATH 010, with a grade of “C” or better.

ACCT 120  Managerial Accounting (3)

An accounting emphasis on manufacturing and commercial cost flows that identifies the kind of information needed, where it can be obtained, and how this information is used by managers as they carry out their planning and decision-making. Prerequisites: ACCT 110 and CS 135, with a grade of “C” or better.

AGRI 101   Fundamentals of Horticulture (3)

Biology and technology involved in the production, storage, processing, and marketing of horticultural plants and products. Laboratories include experiments demonstrating both the theoretical and practical aspects of horticultural plant growth and development. Requires class trips.

AGRI 102 Introduction to Animal Agriculture (3)

A study of animal agriculture emphasizing the efficient production of animal food products from poultry, dairy and meat animals.

AGRI 104 Introduction to Agricultural Systems (3)

Basic principles of selection and operation of agricultural production equipment, including farm tractors and machines and crop-processing equipment. Planning considerations for crop storage and animal production systems and devices for water conservation and erosion control.

AGRI 105  Crop Production (3)

Fundamental principles of crop production and distribution. Emphasis is placed on applying technological advances in agronomy to active crop-production situations, including basic soils, agricultural meteorology, and crop physiology and breeding.

AGRI 203  Agriculture Microeconomics (3)

This course introduces the application of microeconomics as used by farms and agribusiness firms. The behavior of individual firms is evaluated, as price and output are determined in various market structures (pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly). Other topics include pricing and employment of resources, market failure and the social control of industry (government, economics policy, and regulation), cost and production theory.

AGRI 230  Management Methods Agriculture Business (3)

Management of non-farm  agriculturally related businesses. Topics include tools for management decision making, legal forms of business organization, basics of accounting, and important financial management techniques.

AGRI 299  Agriculture Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

ART 125  Appreciation of Art (3)

Students will recognize, understand, and appreciate art through the ages through analysis of the underlying structure common to all art forms and a study of the basic elements and principles of the visual arts.

ART 282  History of Art (3)

Students will learn to describe the intertwined social structures and technologies of world traditions leading to Asian, African, American, and island culture art.

ART 295  Topics in Art (1-3)

Study of selected topics and/or current issues in art. Topics vary depending upon interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

ART 299  Art Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

ASTR 110  General Astronomy (5)

This survey course introduces the student to the fundamental realms of Astronomy. During the duration of the term, the student will examine the known natural process occurring within the universe and just where our place is within the cosmos. Students will compare the Earth’s properties with those of the other planets and explore how the heavens have influenced human thought and action. Astronomical phenomena will be explored along with the many standard topics ranging from planets, stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, and black holes to more esoteric questions concerning the origin of the universe and its evolution and fate. The course will occasionally require the use of sophomore high school level mathematics. In the laboratory requirements, exercises will include experiments in light properties, measurement of Kepler’s Laws, understanding radiation from celestial sources, and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope.

ASTR 299  Astronomy Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

BADM 100  Introduction to Business (3)

As an elective for non-business majors or a first elective for potential business majors, this introductory course includes an initial focus on the effects of business on the economy, society and the individual taxpayer; an overview of management, marketing and finance; and the development of an appreciation of the quantitative tools used in the business environment. Also included is an introduction to the basics of accounting.

BADM 160  Personal Finance (3)

This course emphasizes the management of the individual and family financial resources. The topics profiled in the course are budgets, credit, taxation, insurance, investments, and estate planning.

BADM 210  Business Law (3)

The judicial process in general, and areas of law most relevant to business operations, such as uniform commercial code, contracts, agency and employment, partnerships, corporations, creditor’s rights, and property law.

BADM 220  Business Ethics (3)

This course will focus on the Christian moral and ethical issues that corporate decision-makers face in developing policies about employees, customers, and the general public. In order to formulate policies in these areas, a basic understanding of essential ethical theories is necessary. In addition, the relationship of ethic and moral to law, economics and management will be emphasized. The concepts of corporate ethics programs will be included. To emphasize the realities of these critical issues and concepts, moral and ethical debates will be utilized.

BADM 270  Entrepreneurship (3)

This course offers students the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of business principle associated with starting and maintaining the operations of small businesses. Strategic planning, principles of management, marketing, and business law are integrated into the course.

BADM 299 Business (Accounting/Economics/Finance/Management/Marketing) Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

BIOL 110  The Human Body (5)

A general study of human anatomy & physiology. This course, for non-science majors, investigates the major organ systems of the human body in terms of structure and function. Laboratory is part of this course.

BIOL 114   Biological Concepts for Elementary Teachers (5)

A study of the basic principles of life in sufficient detail to prepare the Elementary Teachers to teach principles of the ‘living environment’ to students in K through 8. Includes scientific thinking skills; and common themes in science. Content is organized to model the developing ability of the elementary students to master the concepts. Laboratory focuses on the process of scientific investigation through inquiries, fieldwork, lab work, etc. modeled to procedures and materials appropriate to the elementary classroom. Lab Fee.

BIOL 122   Principles of Biology I (5)

This course examines the fundamental, unifying principles of biology: the cell theory, and the theories of genetics and evolution. Topics include: the molecular basis of cell function, bioenergetics, cell structure, the cell cycle and division, inheritance and evolution. Lab Fee.

BIOL 124   Principles of Biology II (5)

Survey of the classification, evolution and ecology of life including prokaryotes, viruses, protista, fungi, plants and animals.

BIOL 252  Human Anatomy and Physiology I (5)

Introduction to basic structure and function of the human body including laboratory studies in gross anatomy, histology and physiology. Topics covered include cellular anatomy and physiology, body tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscle and nervous systems. Lab fee.

BIOL 254  Human Anatomy and Physiology II (5)

Second semester topics include cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine and reproductive systems. Lab fee. Prerequisite: BIOL 252, with a grade of “C” or better.

BIOL 270  Microbiology (5)

Investigations of micro organisms such as bacteria, fungi, protozoan and viruses with special emphasis given to bacteria and their specific characteristics, life processes, genetics, and control. Laboratory techniques involve culturing, staining and identification of bacteria. Lab fee.

BIOL 275  Genetics (3)

Introduction to the principles of Genetics: Mendelian genetics and breeding, biochemical genetics and gene engineering, meiosis.

BIOL 285   Humans and Environment (3)

An introduction to the relationship of humans and their environment. Topics include study of physical environment, basic ecological principles, disposal of wastes, uses and abuses of the natural resources and their effect on human health.

BIOL 286   Ecology (5)

Introduction to the principles of Ecology, including both plant and animal: trophic dynamics, communities and biomes, population ecology. Laboratory will focus on field methods for data collection and on analysis of field data. Lab Fee.

BIOL 295  Topics in Environmental Science (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in environmental science. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

BIOL 299   Biology Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

BIS 210 Computer Applications for Business (3)

A problem solving approach using technology to analyzing data and solve problems using Microsoft Excel. Students use critical thinking and analysis to find efficient and effective solutions to real life situations. This course is project oriented. Students will produce multi-sheet workbooks, graphs, charts and give a presentation. Prerequisite: CS 135, with a grade of “C” or better.

BUS 120  Infrastructures (3)

A study of the fundamental building blocks of society, this course explores the basic systems that support our economy, food supply, transportation and our future. You will examine the development of these systems and how they support communication, commerce, and every aspect of modern society.

BUS 220 Logistics & Transportation Systems (3)

This course investigates innovations and practices in the management of inbound materials and goods that impact the ability of manufacturers to produce quality products. You will also develop practical knowledge of outbound shipping and transportation that efficiently meet the needs of customers.

BUS 240 Logistics & Supply Chain Management (3)

Logistics involves seeing everything that flows in, through and out of the company as a whole rather than as separate parts. In this course emphasis is placed on how manufacturers, distributors and end users can provide value in the supply chain.

CHEM 115  Introduction to Chemistry (5)

Introduction to principles of inorganic, organic and biochemistry. Designed for students in the health sciences and related areas. Lab fee. Course does not count toward science or math concentrations. Prerequisite: MATH 104, with a grade of “C” or better.

CHEM 120  General Chemistry I (5)

An in depth study of the fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic structure, chemical bonds, states of matter, solutions, and electrochemistry. Problem solving is emphasized as a part of all important chemistry concepts. Lab fee. Prerequisite: MATH 104 with a grade of “C” or better, or Instructor Consent.

CHEM 121   General Chemistry II with Qualitative Analysis (5)

This course emphasizes the principles of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, complexes and compounds and nuclear chemistry. Ionic equilibria are stressed as a support to qualitative analysis in the laboratory. Descriptive chemistry of metals and non metals is an important component of the course. Lab fee. Prerequisites: MATH 104 and CHEM 120, both with grades of “C” or better.

CHEM 250   Organic Chemistry I (5)

Through an integrated approach a simultaneous study and coverage of aliphatic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds. Reactions of the common functional groups are correlated with each other by means of structural and mechanistic theories. Special emphasis is given to the molecular-orbital description of molecules and intermediates, to resonance mechanisms, optical isomerism and stereoisomerism. Lab fee. Prerequisites: MATH 104 and CHEM 121, both with grades of “C” or better.

CHEM 251   Organic Chemistry II (5)

The study of special groups, e.g. ethers, amines, carbohydrates, proteins, and synthetic polymers. Reactions of the different groups are studied and reasons why one type of reaction takes place in preference to another. Lab fee. Prerequisites: MATH 104 and CHEM 250, both with a grades of “C” or better.

CHEM 295   Topics in Chemistry (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in chemistry. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

CHEM 299   Chemistry Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

COMM 100  Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Introduction to the history and cultural impact of newspapers, magazines, books, radio, television, motion pictures, recorded music, advertising, and public relations. Consideration of ethical issues in mass communication.

COMM 115   Public Speaking (3)

Study of techniques of speech preparation and presentation applicable in professional and private life. Emphasis upon developing self-confidence, attentive listening, and organizational skills.

COMM 118   Basic Audio Production (3)

The study of contemporary audio production. The history of radio, programming and management, the nature of sound and radio, and operation of equipment will be studied. Practical projects include interviews, newscasts, music shows, commercials and public service announcement.

COMM 119   Basic Video Production (3)

A study of the theoretical and practical application of video production. Emphasis placed on performance, use of equipment, and directing techniques. Practical projects include interviews, newscasts and demonstrations. Opportunity for special internships available in final project.

COMM 215   Interpersonal Communication (3)

Study of communication between individuals. Topics include developing self-concept, recognizing differences in perception, learning from emotion, finding meaning in verbal and non-verbal expressions, and resolving conflicts.

COMM 227   Broadcast Announcing (3)

A broad-based examination of the physical and professional aspects of media announcing. General voice theory is addressed, as are a variety of specific announcing techniques, including radio and television announcing, reporting and anchoring, public affairs announcing, and commercial announcing. Students are required to participate in lab exercises associated with the campus radio and television stations. Prerequisites: COMM118 and COMM119.

COMM 230   Small Group Communication (3)

Introduction to effective use of the task-oriented group. Topics include the special nature of group communications, leadership styles, problem solving methods, special types of problems, and applications to various social organizations.

COMM 240/HIST 240   Cinema History (3)

An overview of the development of motion pictures from 1895 to the present; consideration of films and directors responsible for major technical and artistic innovations.

COMM 254  Advertising (3)

This course examines the principles and techniques that lead to successful and effective advertising. Students will be introduced to the history and role of advertising in society, as well as strategies for researching, marketing, planning, implementing and evaluating effective advertising campaigns for a variety of media.

COMM 295  Topics in Communication (1-3)

Study of selected topics and/or current issues in communication. Topics vary, depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

COMM 299  Communication Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

CRJU 150  Introduction to the American Criminal Justice System (3)

A study of the agencies, processes and values involved in the United States criminal justice system – the courts, police, prosecutor, public defender, corrections, and a summary of vocational opportunities.

CRJU 155   Introduction to Corrections (3)

An introduction to penology, a survey of the historic philosophies, values and practices of federal, state, and local correction facilities and programs. Topics include probation, prisons, jails, parole, community corrections, and alternative sanctions.

CRJU 215  Juvenile Delinquency (3)

A study of theories of causation and prevention, incidence, the nature of juvenile delinquency as well as treatment approaches and the response of society to juvenile delinquency.

CRJU 250   Criminal Law and Procedures (3)

A study of law and procedures in the criminal justice system. Much of the learning will take place outside the classroom, such as, observing actual courtroom proceedings and interviewing individuals currently employed in the criminal justice profession. The classroom emphasis is on case study methods and developing the skill of quick and accurate decision-making often required in the profession. This course is for students pursuing a career in criminal justice.

CRJU 273 Criminology (3)

Examination of the factors that lead to crime and criminal behavior. The student will include psychological and biological perspectives, deviance theories, subcultures, social control theory, and labeling theories.

CRJU 275  Introduction to American Law Enforcement (3)

An examination of policing at the local, state and federal levels with emphasis on the relationship between law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies as well as public relations. History, philosophy and duties of a police officer are discussed. Included are principles of command and supervision in personnel management of police organizations, evaluations and promotion, employee welfare, discipline training, problem solving and leadership.

CRJU 295  Topics in Criminal Justice Issues (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in criminal justice. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

CRJU 299  Criminal Justice Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

CS 010  Computer Foundations (1)

This course teaches computer and digital literacy skills. It covers understanding of basic principles and technologies including keyboarding and mouse skills, the Windows operating system, file management, hardware, software, networking, security, email, Internet and the Web. Emphasis will be placed upon hands-on activities to encourage the student to see technology as a tool for learning and communicatino and to help prepare the student for the Computer Literacy course. CREDIT GIVEN DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD A DEGREE or GPA.  A grade of “C” is required to advance to CS 135.

CS 135  Computer Literacy (3)

This course introduces the student to MS-Office Professional software (MS-Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint) with a brief introduction to Windows and the Internet. Emphasis is placed on the applications with many lab exercises and problem solving. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in CS 010 or a score of 2 on the Computer Placement Test. Students wishing to take the online CS135 course must receive a score of 3 on the Computer Placement Test or gain instructor permission.

CS 295  Topics in Computer Information Systems (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in computer information systems. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

CS 299   Computer Science Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

DEVE 010  Reading Concepts I (3)

Emphasis on silent reading techniques, vocabulary development, paragraph analysis; diagnosis of reading problems and individual instruction. Designed for students who need or wish to increase their reading efficiency. Placement in this class is determined by Placement Exam Score. If reading score is below 40, student must enroll in this course. CREDIT GIVEN DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD A DEGREE or GPA.  A grade of “C” is required to advance to DEVE 012.

DEVE 012  Reading Concepts II (3)

A continuation of reading techniques and vocabulary development for college level reading and comprehension proficiency. Placement in this class is determined by Placement Exam Score. If reading score is 40 to 49, the student must enroll in this course. Also for those students who have taken ENGL 010 and have not obtained a final reading score of 50 or above. CREDIT GIVEN DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD A DEGREE or GPA. A grade of “C” is required to advance to 100 level coursework.

DEVE 015  Writing Concepts (3)

A review of grammar, usage and sentence mechanics. Concentration is on the basic skills and various strategies for writing paragraphs. The course is designed for students who need to improve their writing techniques. Placement in this course is determined by Placement Exam Score. If score is below designated minimum, student must enroll in this course. CREDIT GIVEN DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD A DEGREE or GPA.  A grade of “C” is required to advance to ENGL 110.

DEVM 005   Basic College Mathematics: An Applied Approach (3)

This course reviews the basic functions of math, including the numeration systems, fractions, percent and decimals, problem solving and application, ratio and proportion, and an introduction to algebra. Placement in this course is determined by Placement Exam Score. If score is below 65 on the Arithmetic Placement Exam, student must enroll in this course. CREDIT GIVEN DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD A DEGREE OR GPA. A grade of “C” is required to advance to DEVM 010.

DEVM 010  Introductory Algebra (3)

Designed for students with minimal mathematical background. Operations on real- numbers and polynomials, evaluating variable expressions, solving linear equations and inequalities, application problems, systems of linear equations, graphing, operations on rational expressions. Prerequisite: Score of 65 or above on Arithmetic Placement Exam or DEVM005 with a grade of “C” or better. CREDIT GIVEN DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD A DEGREE OR GPA. A grade of “C” is required to advance to MATH 104.

ECON 250   Microeconomics (3)

An introductory study of the principles of a market economy with emphasis on scarcity, market structure and behavior, consumer demand, market supply, price determination, and resource allocation.

ECON 251  Macroeconomics (3)

An introductory study of the performance of the entire economy with emphasis on both economic cycles and fiscal/monetary policies as they apply to unemployment, price stability, growth, and international trade. Prerequisites: Score of 65 or better on the Arithmetic Placement Exam, or a grade of “C” or better in DEVM 005.

ECON 295  Topics in Economics (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in economics. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

ED 102/MATH 102   Mathematics for Early Childhood (3)

Designed for prospective early childhood teachers. Topics will include problem solving, logic, sets, numeration, operations, geometry, and measurement. The use of developmentally appropriate manipulatives and hands-on experiences, including computer programs, will be emphasized as well as application in early childhood settings.

ED 200  Technology for Teachers (3)

This course will provide participants with knowledge of and hands-on experience with integrating technology into classroom instructional activities with a specific emphasis on using technology for research, organization, analysis, and presentation of information. Students will document their technological abilities and learn to critically evaluate educational technology. Prerequisite: CS 135 with a grade of “C” or better.

ED 205   Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3)

An overview of the field of early childhood education and the developing child, ages 0-8. The career of teacher, the history, the goals and the curriculum of early childhood education. Includes 20 hours of field experience in an early childhood setting.

ED 210  Introduction to Teaching (3)

The course is designed to involve prospective teachers in the real issues of American education and to provide a realistic view of the qualities of successful educators to help the student make an informed decision regarding one’s choice of education as a major. Field experience, thirty hours of observation in areas schools and participation in classroom activities, is a necessary requirement. Prerequisite: GPA of 2.0 in college credit classes 100 level or above.

ED 250/PSY 250  Educational Psychology (3)

Developmental approach to the study and application of psychological concepts to the educational process as related to child and adolescent growth, learning theory, teaching effectiveness, individual difference, measurement and research, and classroom management. Prerequisite: PSY 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

ED 256/PSY 256   Human Growth/Development (3)

A study of the physical, cognitive, emotional, social and moral development from the prenatal period to death. Critical issues are explored which relate to education, learning theories, measurement of individual differences, and critical periods throughout the life span. Prerequisite: PSY 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

ED 258   Introduction to Exceptional Children (3)

This course provides an overview of the characteristics, identification, and educational needs of exceptional children. Topics include special education laws, teaching strategies, learning environments, and managing challenging behaviors. Twenty hours of formal observations and field experiences in regular and special educational programs will be required. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ED 205 and ED 256/PSY 256 in early childhood; ED 210 and ED 250/PSY 250 in education. ED 250/PSY 250 and ED 256/PSY 256 can be taken concurrently with ED 258.

ED 260   Curriculum Development using Art, Music and Movement, and Play (3)

This course includes study in art, music and movement, and play. Art: Introduction of materials and methods suitable for presenting art experiences for the young child. Focus on expressive and experimental opportunities available through art media. Examine the place of art activities in the curriculum. Music and Movement: Introduce the relationship of music and movement to the development of the young child. Analyzes methods and materials appropriate for integrating music and movement into the early childhood curriculum. Play: Introduce the importance of play in a young child’s life. Examine how play increases the child’s ability to learn. Different faculty members will teach each area of study during the course of the semester. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ED 205. Can be taken concurrently with ED/PSY 256.

ED 261   The Child in Family, Culture, and Community (3)

Explores the role of families in the educational development of young children. Factors in a culturally diverse society that affect family-child, family-community, and child-community interactions and skills are studied. The course includes strategies to enhance parent involvement. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ED 205. Can be taken concurrently with ED/PSY 256.

ED 262   Communication and Emergent Literacy (3)

An overview of the fields of early speech-language development and literacy skills. Equal attention is given to the development of specific speech sounds, language acquisition, and phonemic awareness, all of which are prerequisites to reading, and the field of early children’s literature. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ED 205. Can be taken concurrently with ED/PSY 256.

ED 265   Learning Environments (3)

This course will include a theoretical base and focus on the physical, social, and cognitive aspects of the situations in which young children from infancy through age eight learn. The emphasis will be on the relationship of the design of space and the behavior of the child. Strategies to empower children to solve conflicts will be included. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in ED 205 and ED/PSY 256.

ED 266  Practicum in Early Childhood Education and Professionalism (4)

Designed as a culminating experience for students in the early childhood associate degree. The student will complete a 60 hour supervised experience in a pre-kindergarten setting, planning appropriate activities, accepting major responsibility for guiding the children, and participating in seminars that address topics such as ethics and professionalism. Prerequisites: All Early Childhood Education courses.

ED 295  Topics in Education (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in education. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

ED 299  Education Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

ENGL 110  Writing I (3)

Principles and techniques of effective writing with emphasis on the short essay. Stress is placed upon generating ideas and developing these ideas according to varied methods. Students become acquainted with the library and available resources. Placement in this class is determined by Placement Exam Score or a “C” in ENGL 015. A grade of “C” is required to advance to ENGL 212.

ENGL 200/JOUR 200   Journalism I: Writing for Media (3)

Introduction to principles of reporting for the mass media, with an emphasis on the reporter’s critical thinking skills in providing detail, accuracy, and informative, ethical communication in news writing. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL110.

ENGL 212  Writing II (3)

Concentration on the development of advanced writing skills. Writing will be directed to different audiences for varied purposes. Some writing will be in response to assigned readings. A research paper is a significant segment of the course. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL110.

ENGL 220   World Literature I (3)

This course explores literature from Antiquity through the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance with selections from both Western and non-Western traditions. Emphasis is on the cultural and historical significance of great works with a goal to promote understanding of enduring human values that are common themes in literature. Research paper and other essays required. May be taken concurrently with ENGL110.

ENGL 221   World Literature II (3)

This course explores literature selections from both Western and non-Western traditions written during the seventeenth century to the present. Emphasis on the cultural and historical significance of great works with a goal to promote understanding of enduring human values that are common themes in literature. Research paper and other essays required. May be taken concurrently with ENGL110.

ENGL 222  American Literature I: Beginnings to 1865 (3)

This course surveys the development of American literature from its beginning with colonial explorers and Native-American storytellers through the colonial period, the American Revolution, and the early Romantics and Transcendentalists to the written responses to the Civil War. Major authors such as Poe, Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau, and Melville will be covered as well as other writers of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Research paper and other essays required. May be taken concurrently with ENGL110.

ENGL 223  American Literature II: From 1865 to Present (3)

This course surveys the multiplying schools and voices within American literature since the Civil War, from local color, realism, and naturalism to twentieth and twenty-first century prose writers, poets, and dramatists. Writers covered include Dickinson, Whitman, Twain, Crane, Frost, O’Neill, and Faulkner. Writing will be discussed in the contest of the historical, political, and cultural events of the times. Research paper and other essays required. May be taken concurrently with ENGL110.

ENGL 231  Creative Writing (3)

Study of structure, techniques and style basic to four literary genres: essays, poetry, short stories and plays. Experience in writing selections for each genre. Workshop criticism. Prerequisite: ENGL 110, with a grade of “C” or better.

ENGL 250/JOUR 250   Journalism II: Emerging Media (3)

A continuation of Journalism I. Students will develop and perfect their interviewing, reporting, writing, and editing techniques using emerging media to film, record, and edit stories for blogs, websites, and news releases, as well as more traditional print media. Prerequisite: ENGL/JOUR 200 with a grade of “C” or better.

ENGL 251   Short Story (3)

The study of fiction as a major form. Changes in technique, tone, and subject matter during the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Stresses analysis and discussion. Prerequisite: ENGL110, with a grade of “C” or better.

ENGL 252   Introduction to Drama (3)

Survey of major dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks through modern times. The study of representative plays focuses upon playwrights’ techniques and their contribution to the world of drama. Prerequisite: ENGL 110, with a grade of “C” or better.

ENGL 255   Shakespeare (3)

In depth analysis of sonnets and plays (comedies, histories, and tragedies). Student reports. Research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL110, with a grade of “C” or better.

ENGL 256   Children’s Literature (3)

Reading, discussion, and evaluation of various types of literature for children as well as developing presentations at various levels. Prerequisite: ENGL 110, with a grade of “C” or better.

ENGL 295 Topics in English (1-3)

Study of selected topics and/or current issues in English. Topics will vary, depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites will vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

ENGL 299 English Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

FREN 110 French I (3)

This introductory course is designed to present the French language and culture to students. Emphasis will be placed upon communication. The course will allow students to understand common situations in Francophone cultures, to listen, to speak, to read, and to write French.

FREN 111 French II (3)

French II continues to present students with the French culture and society while furthering their understanding and practice of the French language. Prerequisite: FREN 110

FREN 299 French Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

HIST 144 History of the United States to 1877 (3)

Survey of the political, economic, social and cultural development in the United States from the time of the founding of the eastern seaboard colonies through Reconstruction.

HIST 145 History of the United States since 1877 (3)

Survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural development from the end of Reconstruction (1877) to the present.

HIST 240/COMM 240 Cinema History (3)

An overview of the development of motion pictures from 1895 to the present; consideration of films and directors responsible for major technical and artistic innovations.

HIST 255 World Civilization: preliterate times to 1660 (3)

Course covers major political, social and cultural development of Europe, Asia and Africa with strong emphasis on Western Civilization.

HIST 256 World Civilization Since 1660 (3)

Covers the major revolutions and wars of the modern age, and emphasizes the various ideological, cultural, religious, political and economic movements that have shaped the world.

HIST 275 Studies in Presidential History (3)

A systematic analysis and interpretation of the United States presidency, the evolution of the demands and requirements of the office, and the people who have held it.

HIST 290 History of American Women (3)

This course is a study of women in the United States from the colonial era to the present, focusing primarily on their social, economic, and political history while also stressing the forces in American society which have most greatly impacted the various roles of women in this time and place.

HIST 295 Topics in History (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in history. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

HIST 299 History Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

HLTH 160 First Aid and Emergency Procedures (2)

Lecture and demonstration of first-aid measures for wounds, hemorrhage, burns, exposure, sprains, dislocations, fractures, unconscious conditions, suffocation, drowning, and poisons, with skill training in all procedures. Students in this course will have the opportunity to become CPR certified.

HLTH 250 Medical Terminology (1) ONLINE ONLY.

This course is designed for students who wish to improve their understanding and use of basic and highly specialized medical and related terminology. Goals are to develop critical thinking and skills to understand vocabulary related to normal and disease processes. Prerequisites: CS 135 with a grade of “C” or better; Student must have computer and internet access.

HLTH 295 Topics in Health (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in health. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

HPER 212 Introduction to Exercise Science (3)

This course introduces the student to the field of exercise science. The course familiarizes the student with the wide range of the field, its development, and the scope of its content. Different career opportunities and organizations in the exercise sciences are discussed. Students are introduced to vocabulary and major concepts in each content area. Content areas included are: exercise physiology, sports nutrition, health and epidemiology, sports biomechanics, athletic training, sports psychology and others.

HPER 215 Principles & Practice of Exercise Science (3)

This course is a study of the scientific principles related to physical fitness and the practical application of principles to directing fitness programming in school, recreational, and corporate settings. Students will be involved in setting up, participating in, and evaluating personal fitness activities within each of these settings. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIOL252, BIOL254, and HPER212.

HPER 259 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3)

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of athletic taping and bracing by learning theory and application strategies. Students will be exposed to injuries and conditions that occur in athletics and physical activity. It will prepare students to recognize an injury, evaluate it, and begin appropriate care. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIOL252, BIOL254, and HPER212.

HPER 299 Exercise Science Internship (1)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 40 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director. This course will also discuss psychological issues and ethical reasoning within a sports setting. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BIOL252, BIOL254, HPER212, HPER215, HPER259, and HLTH160, or by instructor approval.

HUM 101   Freshman Seminar (1)

An introductory course that explores academic and personal skills, learning styles, and critical thinking as well as providing strategies for a successful transition into the college experience. This course introduces students to the electronic portfolio requirement.  Required of all new students who are not enrolled in Freshman Foundations.

HUM 102   Freshman Foundations (3)

An introductory course that expands upon the concepts of Freshman Seminar using the computer as a teaching tool. Topics include: academic and personal skills, learning styles, critical thinking, computer technology, and strategies for college success. This course provides time and instruction to the students on the electronic portfolio requirement. Priority Registration will be given to STEP students. This course may substituted for Freshman Seminar with advisor recommendation.

JOUR 200/ENGL 200  Journalism I: Writing for Media (3)

Introduction to principles of reporting for the mass media, with an emphasis on the reporter’s critical thinking skills in providing detail, accuracy, and informative, ethical communication in news writing. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL110.

JOUR 250/ENGL 250  Journalism II: Emerging Media (3)

A continuation of Journalism I. Students will develop and perfect their interviewing, reporting, writing, and editing techniques using emerging media to film, record, and edit stories for blogs, websites, and news releases, as well as more traditional print media. Prerequisite: ENGL/JOUR 200 with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 102/ED 102   Mathematics for Early Childhood (3)

Designed for prospective early childhood teachers. Topics include problem solving, logic, sets, numeration, operations, geometry, and measurement. The use of developmentally appropriate manipulatives and hands-on experiences, including computer programs, will be emphasized as well as application in early childhood settings. (See also ED 102) For Early Childhood concentrations only.

MATH 104  Intermediate Algebra (3)

Topics include review of real numbers; linear equations and inequalities, application problems; absolute value equations and inequalities; linear functions and graphs; solving systems of equations using various methods; polynomials and functions; rational expressions and equations; roots, radicals and complex numbers; quadratic equations. Prerequisites: Score of 54 or above on Elementary Algebra Placement Exam or DEVM 010 with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 105   Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I (3)

This course is designed for prospective elementary school teachers. Topics include problem solving, inductive and deductive reasoning, numeration systems, natural numbers, sets, modular arithmetic, elementary number theory, basic algebra, and integer operations. Prerequisite: Score of 44 or above on Elementary Algebra Placement Exam. For Elementary Education concentration only.

MATH 106 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (3)

As a sequel to MATH 105, this course is designed for prospective elementary school teachers. Topics include continuing the study of number operations with rational and real numbers; decimals and percents; ratio and proportion; analyzing data, probability and statistics. Prerequisite: MATH 105,with a grade of “C” or better. For Elementary Education concentration only.

MATH 107  Mathematics for Elementary Teachers III (3)

As a sequel to MATH 105 and MATH 106, this course, based on the curriculum standards set by NCTM, is designed for prospective elementary school teachers. Topics include two and three dimensional geometry, measurement, metric system, constructions/mappings, and coordinate geometry.
Prerequisite: MATH 105 and MATH 106, with a grade of “C” or better. For Elementary Education concentration only.

MATH 110   College Algebra (3)

The real number system, radicals, rational exponents, polynomials, rational expressions, absolute value equations and inequalities, graphing functions, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, system of equations and inequalities, equations of higher degree. Prerequisite: Score of 44 or above on College Level Math Placement Exam, or MATH 104, with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 125   Finite Mathematics (3)

An extension of earlier work in mathematics to applications in business, economics, and the life and social sciences. Specifically, the course introduces these topics: systems of linear equations and matrices, linear programming, probability and statistics, the mathematics of finance, Markov chains, games and decisions. Throughout the course, there is an emphasis on realistic applications, examples, and exercises. Prerequisite: Score of 44 or above on College Level Placement Exam or MATH 104, with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 130  Trigonometry (3)

Functions of acute angles, solution of right triangles and applications; functions of a general angle, identities, related angles, radian measure, graphs and trigonometric functions, addition formulas and related identities, oblique triangles, inverse trigonometric functions. A calculator is required. Prerequisite: Score of 55 or above on College Level Math Placement Exam or MATH 110, with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 215   Statistics (3)

Sampling methods and pitfalls, frequency distributions, correlation and regression, descriptive statistics, introduction to probability, probability distributions, hypothesis tests and interval estimates, statistical inference with two populations, statistical inference concerning proportions and standard deviations. Prerequisite: MATH 104, with a grade of “C” or better, or score of 44 or above on College Level Math Placement Exam.

MATH 220  Pre-Calculus (4)

A review of mathematics needed for success in calculus: linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and trigonometric equations and identities. Prerequisite: Score of 65 or above on College Level Math Placement Exam, or MATH110, with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 230  Calculus I (5)

Plane analytic geometry and differential calculus, and an introduction to integral calculus of functions of a single variable with applications. Prerequisite: Score of 86 or above on College Level Math Placement Exam or MATH 110 and MATH 130 or MATH 220, with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 231  Calculus II (5)

Integral calculus of functions of a single variable, sequences and series, vectors, and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 230, with a grade of “C” or better.

MATH 295  Topics in Mathematics (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in mathematics. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

MATH 299   Mathematics Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

MGT 210   Principles of Management (3)

An introduction to the concepts, theories, and techniques of contemporary management. Emphasis is placed on the basic functions of management: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.

MGT 280   Business Case Studies (3)

This course places emphasis on current issues, special topics, and business analysis. Students will integrate critical thinking, written and oral communication, and managerial practices in a complete case study.

MGT 295 Topics in Management (1-3) A study of selected topics and/or current issues in management. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

MKT 220   Principles of Marketing (3)

A study of the activities and decisions involved in the flow of quality goods and services to the ultimate domestic and international users with analysis of the marketing strategies of various diverse organizations.

MUS 115   Music Theory I (3)

Fundamentals of notation and written harmonic techniques based on the composers of the 17th-19th centuries; includes principles of part writing and figures, basses, analysis in melodies, rhythms, harmonies and small forms.

MUS 116 Music Theory II (3)

Continuation of MUS 115 through secondary and dominant seventh chords and beginning modulations. Creating original music is encouraged. Prerequisite: MUS 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

MUS 125 Appreciation of Music (3)

General background of music from primitive times to the present with emphasis on listening; explanation of themes, content and form designed to increase understanding and enjoyment of all styles of music.

MUS 132 Organ Literature I (3)

Survey of organ literature suitable for church services with consideration to the church year; student performance in class is required. Each student is required to attend four organ recitals and/or church services where a major musical work is being performed.

MUS 133 Organ Literature II (3)

Prerequisite: MUS 132, with a grade of “C” or better.

MUS 136 Organ I (1)

First of four semesters of organ that may be taken for credit. Applied Music Fee.

MUS 137 Organ II (1)

Second of four semesters of organ that may be taken for credit. Applied Music Fee.
Prerequisite: MUS 136, with a grade of “C” or better.

MUS 138 Organ III (1)

Third of four semesters of organ that may be taken for credit. Applied Music Fee.
Prerequisite: MUS 137, with a grade of “C” or better.

MUS 139 Organ IV (1)

Fourth of four semesters of organ that may be taken for credit. Applied Music Fee.
Prerequisite: MUS 138, with a grade of “C” or better.

MUS 140 Piano I (1)

First of four semesters of piano that may be taken for credit. Students expected to play all Major, Harmonic and Melodic Minor scales, 4 octaves minimum, tempo 80. Two or three part inventions. Suites, Dances of Bach; Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven Sonatas equal to the difficulty of Mozart’s Sonata in A. Also shorter works of Romantic and Modern composers. Applied Music Fee.

MUS 141 Piano II (1)

Second of four semesters of piano that may be taken for credit. Students expected to play scales as above – 100. Also Major, Minor, Dominant and Diminished arpeggios, 4 octaves, all keys, all positions, 4 octaves 80. Preludes and Fugues from Well Tempered Clavier, Bach; Sonatas to the difficulty of Pathetique, Beethoven; standard works of Romantic and Modern composers. Applied Music Fee. Prerequisite: MUS 140.

MUS 142 Piano III (1)

Third of four semesters of piano that may be taken for credit. Applied Music Fee.
Prerequisite: MUS 141, with a grade of “C” or better.

MUS 143 Piano IV (1)

Fourth of four semesters of piano that may be taken for credit. Applied Music Fee.
Prerequisite: MUS142, with a grade of “C” or better.

MUS 148 Violin (1)

Students are expected to learn proper violin technique through scales, etudes and the study of solo violin literature. A variety of violin literature will be chosen by the instructor to meet the needs and ability of the student. Applied Music Fee.

MUS 295 Topics in Music (1-3)

Study of selected topics and/or current issues in Music. Topics may vary, depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

MUS 299 Music Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

NURS 010   Nursing Concepts (2)

Designed for nursing students to develop and/or strengthen study, test-taking, and critical thinking skills. Time and stress management, basic nursing calculations and nursing case scenarios will be discussed and applied. The course is required for students who meet certain criteria. CREDIT DOES NOT COUNT TOWARD A DEGREE OR AS PART OF A GPA. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.   Prerequisite: Admission to the nursing program.

NURS 102 Transition to Professional Nursing (1)

LPN to RN Bridge only. The course will focus on the transition to the RN role and responsibilities. Emphasis is on the professional role of the RN, including developing care plans, cultural competency, health care teaching, critical thinking, evidence based nursing and introduction to nursing research and theory. Co-requisite: NURS 103 and NURS 240.

NURS 103 Nursing Assessment and Diagnosis (3)

LPN to RN Bridge only. This course focuses on achieving the nursing skills to provide holistic nursing care to adults. The course will detail medical/surgical nursing principals and skills involving adult health assessment and nursing diagnosis in the holistic nursing management of chronic and acute health issues. Content is derived from the Ancilla College first year curriculum and is designed to allow the Bridge student to transition directly into the second year of the ADN program. The course includes lecture, case scenario and laboratory practice. The course will build upon the LPN skill set to detail medical and surgical conditions, physical assessment and specific nursing skills to assess, diagnose, plan, intervene and evaluate patient care in acute care settings. This class includes class and laboratory time. Co-requisite: NURS 102 and NURS 240.

NURS 110 Fundamentals of Nursing (6)

This course emphasizes basic nursing concepts and incorporates the development of conceptual skills needed for therapeutic nursing interventions for culturally diverse individuals. Focus is placed on providing a solid foundation of technical and interpersonal skills. The nursing process is introduced, including its application to nursing care, using clinical and laboratory settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the nursing program and completion of prerequisites.

NURS 210 Life Span Nursing I (7)

This course emphasizes evolving nursing concepts and incorporates the continued development of conceptual skills needed for therapeutic nursing interventions for culturally diverse individuals throughout the lifespan. Focus is placed on providing nursing care to adults with medical or surgical illnesses and their families as well as the continual development of interpersonal skills. Progressive application of the nursing process is expected of students as they complete clinical assignments in acute and structured community settings. Prerequisite: NURS 110, with a grade of “C” or better.

NURS 211 Life Span Nursing II (7)

This course focuses on advanced nursing care of adult individuals and their families across the lifespan. Emphasis is on holistic nursing care of adults with acute and chronic medical or surgical illnesses and their families. Advanced application of the nursing process is used by students. Clinical experiences are provided in acute and structured community settings. Prerequisite: NURS 210 and NURS 260, with a grade of “C” or better.

NURS 240 Nursing Issues, Trends & Ethics (3)

Introduction to nursing history, interpersonal relationships, leadership, legal and ethical responsibilities and nursing as a profession. Course also covers up-to-date information on current nursing issues and trends. Concurrent enrollment in NURS 103 and NURS 210 or NURS 211. NURS 240 offered summer session is for LPN Bridge students only or by Division Director consent.

NURS 250 Maternal/Child Nursing (5)

This course emphasizes the application of the nursing process to a specialized population dealing with reproduction and human growth and development. Focus is placed on identifying and meeting the physical, psychosocial and health educational needs of culturally diverse families during pregnancy, childbirth, and childhood. Students complete clinical assignments in both acute and outpatient care settings in which services are provided to women and their families during pregnancy, childbirth, and childhood.  Prerequisites: NURS 210 and NURS 260, with a grade of “C” or better.

NURS 255  Psychiatric Nursing (5)

This course focuses on the psychosocial needs of clients and their families with psychiatric and chemical dependency diseases. Students will apply the nursing process to care for assigned clients. Students will gain an understanding of individuals and families with mental disease and substance abuse issues. Clinical experiences will be obtained through local psychiatric facilities. This class has three hours of class instruction and six hours of clinical each week. Prerequisites: NURS 210 and NURS 260 with a grade of “C” or better.

NURS 260 Pharmacology (3)

This course will focus on understanding the role and responsibilities of the nurse in medication administration including, but not limited to, pre-administration assessment, evaluating therapeutic effects, safety, minimizing adverse effects, and patient teaching. Prerequisite: NURS 110 with a grade of “C” or better.

NURS 299 Nursing Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

NUTR 110  Nutrition (3)

A course based on significant contributions from chemistry, biology and physiology providing an in-depth introduction to the principles of nutrition at the molecular level. Each of the nutrients known to be of importance in the science of nutrition is analyzed from many angles to broaden understanding of the body’s metabolic processes, needs and how to meet them.

PHIL 115  Introduction to Philosophy (3)

This course offers a general introduction to the history, methods, and topics in philosophy. The course will focus on philosophical method, the nature of reality and perception, ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of religion. Students will develop more sophisticated tools for logic and reasoning, while learning to think critically and communicate effectively in oral and written form.

PHIL 150 Logic (3)

Introduction to different strategies for constructing and evaluating arguments. Emphasis placed on the development of skills needed to deal competently with the concepts of deductive and inductive logic. Arguments encountered in everyday life as well as more formal techniques of logical analysis, both traditional and contemporary, are studied.

PHIL 155   Ethics (3) The study of the history and methods of theological and philosophical ethics, examining the nature of good and evil, objective moral law and subjective experience, as well as natural law and conscience. The course emphasizes contemporary issues in light of classic philosophy, while helping students think critically and articulate their own viewpoints.

PHIL 295  Topics in Philosophy (1-3) Study of selected topics and/or current issues on philosophy. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

PHYS 201   Physics I (5)

First semester of a two-semester algebra based sequence. Newtonian mechanics, wave motion, heat and thermodynamics. Lab Fee. Prerequisites: MATH 110, with a grade of “C” or better.

PHYS 202  Physics II (5)

Second semester of a two-semester algebra based sequence. Electricity (study of electrical charges at rest and in motion), magnetism (study of magnets and their interaction with electrical charges), and an introduction to the concepts of relativity, quantum theory, and atomic and nuclear physics. Lab Fee. Prerequisite: PHYS 201, with a grade of “C” or better.

PSC 110  Geosystems of the Earth (5)

This survey course introduces the student to Atmospheric and Earth Science concepts, theories, procedures, systems and resources, i.e. the “Geosystems of the Earth.” Atmospheric and Earth Science are twin sciences. The course explores their integration and application which will lead to an understanding of the world around us respective to the discipline of physical science.

PSC 299   Physical Science Internship (1-3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

PSCI 160  American National Government (3)

A study of the historical origin, the Constitutional basis and the dynamics, forms, powers and functions of the National Government.

PSCI 270  United States Political History (3)

The origin and evolution of political parties, election results, historic political leaders, the process of being elected to office, and an analysis of how our unique political system works.

PSCI 295 Topics in Municipal Government (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in municipal government. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

PSCI 299 Political Science Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

PSY 115  General Psychology (3)

The scope and methods of psychology; sensation; perception; motivation and emotion; learning and thought processes; personality, theoretical perspectives and sub-fields.

PSY 220/SOC 220  Social Psychology (3)

This course will look at social influences on behavior and individual psychology. Influence, conformity, socialization, gender, group behavior, social exchange, and aggression will be covered. This course is to give students a clear understanding of the principles of Social Psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

PSY 250/ED 250 Educational Psychology (3)

Developmental approach to the study and application of psychological concepts to the educational process as related to child and adolescent growth, learning theory, teaching effectiveness, individual differences, measurement and research and classroom management. Prerequisite: PSY 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

PSY 256/ED 256  Human Growth/Development (3)

A study of the physical, cognitive, emotional, social and moral development from the prenatal period to death. Critical issues are explored which relate to education, learning theories, measurement of individual differences, and critical periods throughout the life span. Prerequisite: PSY 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

PSY 265  Abnormal Psychology (3)

Primary emphasis on etiology, symptomology, treatment modalities and prevention. A first course in abnormal psychology with emphasis on forms of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

PSY 295  Topics in Psychology (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in psychology. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

PSY 299  Psychology Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

REL 115   Old Testament (3)

An introduction to the history of ancient Israel as presented in the Scripture. Students will learn the guidelines for, and fundamentals of, biblical exegesis – acquiring the academic tools for studying, interpreting, and understanding the Old Testament. Emphasis is given to the Pentateuch, Historical Books, Prophets, and Wisdom Writings.
REL 120 New Testament (3) An introduction to the development of the early communities of the Christian faith as presented in the Scripture. Students will learn the guidelines for, and fundamentals of, biblical exegesis – acquiring the academic tools for studying, interpreting, and understanding the New Testament. Emphasis is given to the life and teaching of Jesus and the formation of the early Church in the Epistles and Revelation.

REL 152   Study of World Religions (3)

Introduction to the study of world religions, nature, God, revelation, quest for the sacred, encounter with and response to the divine; the reality beyond. Special emphasis on each student developing his/her own personal statement of belief.

REL 160  Religion and American Culture (3)

Religion’s central role in the shaping of America. Traditional religious groups in the United States with attention to developments, institutions, distinctive practices and beliefs. Religious elements in contemporary American culture. The influence of American culture.

REL 295  Topics in Religion (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in religion. Topics may vary, depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

REL 299  Religion Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

SOC 140   Introduction to Sociology (3)

An introduction to the basic concepts and theoretical approaches of studying structures, human group interactions and processes. Key topics include the organization of social life, social institutions, social inequalities and the changing society.

SOC 160  Social Problems (3)

An analysis of selected problems of contemporary American society, particularly those arising from personal deviance, social disorganization, social change, and selected problems of global significance; an evaluation of remedial measures. Prerequisite: SOC 140, with a grade of “C” or better.

SOC 170  Culture and Society (3)

A comparative study of contemporary human cultures showing relationships to social processes and behavior. Introductory course. Prerequisite: SOC 140, with a grade of “C” or better.

SOC 220/PSY 220  Social Psychology (3)

This course will look at social influences on behavior and individual psychology. Influence, conformity, socialization, gender, group behavior, social exchange, and aggression will be covered. This course is to give students a clear understanding of the principles of Social Psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 115, with a grade of “C” or better.

SOC 265  Marriage and the Family (3)

An analysis of structure and processes of marriage and the family in contemporary society; examination of the impact of social change; emphasis placed upon those mechanisms that enhance intimacy in marriage and the family. Prerequisite: SOC 140, with a grade of “C” or better.

SOC 291   Sociology of the Aging (3)

A study of the aging process with emphasis on the biological, psychological and sociological aspects of aging. This course is primarily for those in the helping professions and all others who seek a better understanding of aging. Prerequisite: SOC 140, with a grade of “C” or better.

SOC 295 Topics in Social Issues (1-3)

A study of selected topics and/or current issues in social issues. Topics may vary depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

SOC 299   Sociology Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.

SPAN 110  Spanish I (3)

The first in a sequence, courses are designed to develop communicative competency. Active participation is encouraged through a wide variety of student-centered activities. Grammar introduced lexically and then reinforced through a formal explanation of structure. Additional use of audiotapes and written exercises ensures ample practice in language skills.

SPAN 111  Spanish II (3)

The second in a sequence, courses are designed to develop communicative competency. Active participation is encouraged through a wide variety of student-centered activities. Grammar introduced lexically and then reinforced through a formal explanation of structure. Additional use of audiotapes and written exercises ensures ample practice in language skills. Prerequisite SPAN 110, with a grade of “C” or better.

SPAN 295  Topics in Spanish (1-3)  (As Needed)

Study of selected topics and/or current issues in Spanish. Topics may vary, depending upon the interests of faculty and students. Prerequisites may vary. The Division and the Academic Council must approve all topics.

SPAN 299   Spanish Internship (3)

This course is a collaboration between local businesses/organizations and Ancilla College. Students are required to complete 120 hours of observation and active participation based upon directions set up by the instructor and the internship director.